In an open letter on the Apple website, Steve jobs calls for the end of DRM, or Digital Rights Management. He says that Apple's current iTunes format was forced upon the company by the music companies they licensed music from, insisting control. The problem with DRM is that people keep finding out the 'secrets' that protect DRM and break the existing system.

In an open letter on the Apple website, Steve jobs calls for the end of DRM, or Digital Rights Management. He says that Apple's current iTunes format was forced upon the company by the music companies they licensed music from, insisting control. The problem with DRM is that people keep finding out the ‘secrets' that protect DRM and break the existing system. Jobs goes on to suggest three future alternatives and indicates that Apple will follow the third:

The third alternative is to abolish DRMs entirely. Imagine a world where every online store sells DRM-free music encoded in open licensable formats. In such a world, any player can play music purchased from any store, and any store can sell music which is playable on all players. This is clearly the best alternative for consumers, and Apple would embrace it in a heartbeat. If the big four music companies would license Apple their music without the requirement that it be protected with a DRM, we would switch to selling only DRM-free music on our iTunes store. Every iPod ever made will play this DRM-free music.

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