There's an insightful but confusing radio show on NPR that could be worth a listen. The show interviews Suzanne Wasserman, director of the Gotham Center for New York City History, and Neil Smith, Distinguished Professor of Anthropology and Geography - both from the City University of New York.

There's an insightful but confusing radio show on NPR that could be worth a listen. The show interviews Suzanne Wasserman, director of the Gotham Center for New York City History, and Neil Smith, Distinguished Professor of Anthropology and Geography – both from the City University of New York. Wasserman and Smith complain about the suburbanization of New York: the monotony of a city filled with Banana Republics, Olive Trees and same-same street-fairs. Wasserman makes a good case against encroaching suburbanization because of the loss of sense of place all the uniformity creates. Smith seems to just clamber after a New York he read in an old novel or saw in an old movie – he longs for a city with ‘edge' while Wasserman admits that she's happy that there's better personal safety.

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