According to this recent Forbes article, telecoms appears to be an emerging business in Afghanistan. But perhaps more surprising is the fact that one company is successfully employing women in...

According to this recent Forbes article, telecoms appears to be an emerging business in Afghanistan. But perhaps more surprising is the fact that one company is successfully employing women in an extremely conservative society. For example, the article highlights the fact that a 25 year-old widow is earning $300 USD a month (and supporting her family of eight) by renting out cellular phone service by the call minute.

Hassani is one of 50 Afghan women who earn such commissions by working for a cell company called Roshan ("light" in Dari and Pashto). It is one of Afghanistan’s largest private businesses, with 850 employees, 23% of them women. Since its January 2003 launch Roshan has invested $250 million in infrastructure, with another $75 million slated for this year, to spread across 175 cities and villages and provide mobile phone service to 1.2 million customers–half the market. No profits yet, though revenue is climbing, up from $170 million in 2005 to an estimated $200 million last year.

BASIC MEMBER CONTENT
This content is available for Basic Members.
Already a member, log in