We've written before about a trend where older folk are retiring by moving into cities not out of them. Inspired by the facilities and entertainment close at hand, boomers are leaving suburbia for a city environment. A recent article in the WSJ reminds us of this trend...

We’ve written before about a trend where older folk are retiring by moving into cities not out of them. Inspired by the facilities and entertainment close at hand, boomers are leaving suburbia for a city environment. A recent article in the WSJ reminds us of this trend:

In Denver, about half of the units in the recently completed Glass House sold to empty-nesters, despite youth-oriented amenities such as a videogame lounge and a Web site that promises “cool bars” and “a fresh vibe.” In New York, even a hot tub above the lobby and a provocative marketing campaign couldn’t keep boomers away from William Beaver House, slated to open next year. And when Viridian opened last October in Nashville, most locals expected the high-rise to draw young buyers looking for a chance to live downtown. It did, but it also attracted people like Julie Lammel, a speech pathologist in her early 50s who moved there from a suburb where most of her neighbors were in her own age group.”

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