Readers may have noticed our excitement over projects like mobile banking in Africa and micro-financing in Asia which seem to give everyday people in those countries the tools to improve their lives on an economic level. For a long time, there has been a call for more and more aid to the 'Third World', but now we're witnessing a call to help drive the entrepreneurial spirit of the people there.

Readers may have noticed our excitement over projects like mobile banking in Africa and micro-financing in Asia which seem to give everyday people in those countries the tools to improve their lives on an economic level. For a long time, there has been a call for more and more aid to the ‘Third World', but now we're witnessing a call to help drive the entrepreneurial spirit of the people there.

Recently the TED conference held a spin off in Africa called the TEDGlobal 2007 which explored how can the world could help make every African family better off. In the NY Times, Jason Pontin describes what he saw as a “small skirmish” in a larger ideological conflict between those who believe that Africa needs more and better international aid, and those who think entrepreneurialism and technology will lift the continent out of poverty. One example of entrepreneurialism, he points out, is the success of home-grown Vodacom Congo which had more than 1.5 million mobile phone subscribers in 2006.

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