In February, Steve Jobs wrote an open letter on the Apple site asking music companies to dump DRM protection of digital music tracks. EMI responded by allowing Apple to sell...

In February, Steve Jobs wrote an open letter on the Apple site asking music companies to dump DRM protection of digital music tracks. EMI responded by allowing Apple to sell new tracks at a higher price that were supposedly DRM free. Analysis of these new iTunes tracks shows that these tracks come with user data including the original buyer’s email address and account number. The BBC reports:

The tracks without the digital locks, known as Digital Rights Management (DRM) technology, officially went on sale on 30 May under the iTunes Plus banner. The downloads cost $1.29 (99p in the UK) rather than $0.99 (79p in the UK).

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