The New York Times reports that more and more people in relationships across the US find boxing against each other as not only a great way to stay fit together but also as an effective way to build trust as well.... Men either have to tone their punches down or not punch at all, while women typically unload with everything they've got.More on the therapeutic value of coed sparring:In the wake of an argument, sparring may smooth the way to straight-talking, said Stacy Kaiser, a psychotherapist in Los Angeles who advises clients about staying in shape.

Boxing for couples is becoming a much-debated emerging trend. The New York Times reports that more and more people in relationships across the US find boxing against each other as not only a great way to stay fit together but also as an effective way to build trust as well. There are modified rules of course. Men either have to tone their punches down or not punch at all, while women typically unload with everything they've got.

More on the therapeutic value of coed sparring:

In the wake of an argument, sparring may smooth the way to straight-talking, said Stacy Kaiser, a psychotherapist in Los Angeles who advises clients about staying in shape. “It ends the rage and usually enables them to now talk,” Ms. Kaiser said. “It is not going to solve day-to-day issues. Conversation does that. But if you are a couple that has a lot of anger and anxiety and aggression, it can be very healthy. It can be a great reliever of all those.”

UP YOUR QUOTA FOR JUST $15 A MONTH
PSFK’s Premium Subscription provides access to a database of over 100,000 articles featuring new ideas, interviews, analysis and opinion on the latest innovation in brand, customer and retail experience.
Already a subscriber? Log in
(powered by Wallkit)