An article on InfoWorld reports on the concerns that have been raised by clauses that suggest that anybody who puts content on Google's shared document service, Google Docs, grants Google the rights to reproduce and share that content.

An article on InfoWorld reports on the concerns that have been raised by clauses that suggest that anybody who puts content on Google's shared document service, Google Docs, grants Google the rights to reproduce and share that content. Infoworld says:

Google is in damage control mode over a clause in the user agreements for its Google Docs and Spreadsheets applications that implies an inordinate degree of power over the content that runs over its services.

The clause reads: “By submitting, posting or displaying Content on or through Google services which are intended to be available to the members of the public, you grant Google a worldwide, nonexclusive, royalty-free license to reproduce, adapt, modify, publish and distribute such content on Google services for the purpose of displaying, distributing and promoting Google services.”

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