In an article in New York magazine, Arianne Cohen gets a job at Trader Joes in NY to join all the other aspiring Filmmakers, actors, fashion students and marial artists. She explains why you get a different attitude with the store clerks at Trader Joes...

In an article entitled ‘the Supermarket of the Struggling Artist’ in New York magazine, Arianne Cohen gets a job at Trader Joe’s in NY to join all the other aspiring Filmmakers, actors, fashion students and marial artists. She explains why you get a different attitude with the store clerks at Trader Joes:

Vinny tells me to come at midnight for a tasting party. “You’re held to a higher standard here. Unlike at Shop Rite, you need to tell customers about their food.”

I arrive to find 45 employees gathered around fold-up tables along the meat wall. Ten crew members from the morning shift are here, along with dozens of artists of indeterminate art—only the fashion graduates are discernible, in buttoned cardigans and tank tops created from Trader Joe’s T-shirts. It’s a cliquey crowd, not unlike high school, but devoid of Queen Bee girls and King Jock guys. It seems odd to me that such a smart, creative group would come back at midnight by choice. Melody Louisdhon, a bubbly girl I’ve seen many times, stands giggling in the corner, despite the fact that she no longer works here. She came because, for these kids, the city can be a hostile place. It’s a cabless lifestyle of fearing the mailbox, and college friends who have moved on to jobs in their fields and who don’t understand.

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