Which means they're built in such a way - beats first, hi-hat brought in after 16 bars, bass introduced, wonky digital motif begins etc - that makes them sound completely dull when they're compiled - naked, ugly and embarrassed to be there - as separate tracks on an album.... The whole problem, whether we're talking about UNKLE or Phats and Small, Sasha or Black Strobe, has been dance music's lack of self-confidence, with producers seeking to invest their albums with rock-like variations in tempo and texture.

Tony Naylor in the Guardian music blog says that producers have stopped trying to shoehorn dance tracks into a rock album format and are finally onto something good. He says that folks like LCD Soundsystem, Ricardo Villalobos and Luke Solomon are showing the way by creating albums where the tracks appear to be a continuous DJ-mix:

The 12″ single or the stand-alone MP3 is dance music’s modus operandi. These are individual tracks with a specific basic function. They’re meant to make people dance and are aimed primarily at club DJs. Which means they’re built in such a way – beats first, hi-hat brought in after 16 bars, bass introduced, wonky digital motif begins etc – that makes them sound completely dull when they’re compiled – naked, ugly and embarrassed to be there – as separate tracks on an album.

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