Directed by Sato, the look he wanted for the store and the Uniqlo brand overall was “the ultra-contemporary cool aspect of Japan, its pop culture rather than something traditional and Japanesey,” he says. ...Sato says that transferring this look from Japan was an important part of raising the brand abroad and a matter of exploiting those design elements he sees as Japanese: “They are logical, clean, high-quality, speed, flat, graphical,” he says.

Creative Review has a lengthy look at the story behind the rebirth of Uniqlo, focusing on Kashiwa Sato was brought in as creative director and Yugo Nakamura brought in to direct their online vision. Insightful reading:

There are minimalist hints at the spareness of traditional Japanese design, with nods towards Manga, hi-tech and industrial chic but with some softer Japanese trad elements such as tatami. Directed by Sato, the look he wanted for the store and the Uniqlo brand overall was “the ultra-contemporary cool aspect of Japan, its pop culture rather than something traditional and Japanesey,” he says.

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