There's interesting thought piece over at Atlantic that wonders if the flight from America's suburbs and exurbs by folks who can no longer afford the housing (and the gas prices to reach home) will have the similar negative effect as when people fleeing the cities in the sixties and seventies.

In the Franklin Reserve neighborhood of Elk Grove, California, south of Sacramento, the houses are nicer than those at Windy Ridge—many once sold for well over $500,000—but the phenomenon is the same. At the height of the boom, 10,000 new homes were built there in just four years. Now many are empty; renters of dubious character occupy others. Graffiti, broken windows, and other markers of decay have multiplied. Susan McDonald, president of the local residents’ association and an executive at a local bank, told the Associated Press, “There’s been gang activity. Things have really been changing, the last few years.”

UP YOUR QUOTA FOR JUST $15 A MONTH
PSFK’s Premium Subscription provides access to a database of over 100,000 articles featuring new ideas, interviews, analysis and opinion on the latest innovation in brand, customer and retail experience.
Already a subscriber? Log in
(powered by Wallkit)