Using thin, flexible silicon electronics attached to a silk substrate, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania have made electronics that can almost completely dissolve inside the body.

Using thin, flexible silicon electronics attached to a silk substrate, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania have made electronics that can almost completely dissolve inside the body.

Potential applications include photonic tattoos that could show blood sugar readings and electrodes that could interface with the nervous system.

Next Nature explains more:

While implanted electronics must usually be encased to protect them from the body, these electronics don’t need protection. The whole process is pretty much seamless: The electronics on the flexible silk substrates conform to biological tissue. The silk melts away over time and the thin silicon circuits left behind don’t cause irritation because they are just nanometers thick.

READ THIS ARTICLE FOR $15
$15 provides access to this article and every case-study, interview, and analysis piece that we publish for the next 30 days. Our Premium Subscription also provides access to a database of over 100,000 articles on innovation in brand, customer, and retail experience.
Already a subscriber? Log in