Brand language syndrome runs throughout the auto industry but there is one manufacturer who chooses to be different.

For automotive design, the last decade could largely be described in terms of being brand language driven. Three fancy words for applying the same shapes to a variety of vehicle types in order to create a family look. That's why all BMW's look similar, and Lincolns, and even VW's. In good cases, adopting a brand language can be beneficial if it has a strong personality. Conversely, with a weak brand image, you get a lot of boring cars that look the same. Brand language syndrome runs throughout the auto industry but there is one manufacturer who chooses to be different.

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