A unique media art piece moves beyond digital interaction and the human audience.

Anyone who visited Decode: Digital Design Sensations at the Victoria and Albert museum was greeted with a multitude of disparate art objects (from painting by body movement to woven mirrors that offered projected silhouettes) promising to codify media art's principles: essentially, one defined by digitally enabled interaction. This interaction principle is repeatedly heralded as the innovation for many media art objects; however, often many of the media art objects at Decode and other “new media” shows feel like a one trick pony, whereby a certain action allows for a set responses–the object's response, unlike the human audience, is dependent upon a feedback loop defined by it's creator.

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