Essayist and programmer Paul Graham explores how new, more powerful technology is causing addictive behavior.

Essayist and programmer Paul Graham has written an intriguing piece which looks at society’s accelerated technological progress, and how it’s creating a world that is increasingly addictive. He begins:

What hard liquor, cigarettes, heroin, and crack have in common is that they’re all more concentrated forms of less addictive predecessors. Most if not all the things we describe as addictive are. And the scary thing is, the process that created them is accelerating.

We wouldn’t want to stop it. It’s the same process that cures diseases: technological progress. Technological progress means making things do more of what we want. When the thing we want is something we want to want, we consider technological progress good. If some new technique makes solar cells x% more efficient, that seems strictly better. When progress concentrates something we don’t want to want—when it transforms opium into heroin—it seems bad. But it’s the same process at work.

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