(Video) Using Twitter Data To Track Public Mood

(Video) Using Twitter Data To Track Public Mood

The Happiness Map visualizes word usage on the micro-blogging platform to display the mental state of its users.

Yofred Moik
  • 22 july 2010

Alan Mislove, a computer scientist at Boston’s Northeastern University, learned that in the U.S., the west coast is generally happier than the east coast and that the nation’s happiness peaks on Sunday mornings and spirals down on Thursday evenings. Extracted words from Twitter streams were evaluated by a mood-rating system called Affective Norms for English Words (ANEW).  ANEW determines the positive or negative tone of the word and assigns it a mood score. For example, positive words like “love” and “paradise” indicate happiness while “funeral” and “suicide” are negative. Through filtering the tweets by geographic location the scientists rendered a infographic-style video, where viewers can monitor each state’s hour-to-hour trend of moods.

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