A study by Carnegie Mellon University explores the dichotomy between how users perceived their online privacy practices and how they unknowingly divulged personal information.

In a research project by Carnegie Mellon University to be published in the Journal of Consumer Research, researchers explored the dichotomy between how users perceived their online privacy practices and how they unknowingly divulged personal information.

The study asked a set of questions on three different websites: one designed to be trustworthy, a neutral site, and a privacy unfriendly site.

Of the three sites, users were more willing to admit to engaging in illicit and socially questionable activities with sites that appeared less official. Researchers concluded that this might have to do with the perception that less official looking sites were not as likely to protect your information, store, and sell your information.

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