Douglas Rushkoff talks about how the shutdown of WikiLeaks could prompt a new decentralized computer network, and the rise of a new virtual currency called Bitcoins.

In response to the speed and efficiency with which the WikiLeaks site and its funding were taken offline, and the failure of the anonymous hacker movement to do any significant damage to Wikileaks' corporate foes, media commentator Douglas Rushkoff notes how the situation illustrates how centrally-controlled the internet really is. Rushkoff sees the Wikileaks debacle becoming a rallying point towards developing an new, alternate internet:

The internet's failings as a truly decentralized network, however, merely point the way toward what a decentralized network might actually look like. Instead of being administrated by central servers, it would operate through computers that pinged one another, instead of corporate-owned server farms, and deliver web pages from anywhere, even our own computers. The FCC and other governing bodies may attempt to defang the threat of the original internet by ending net neutrality. But if they did, such a new network — a second, “people's internet” — would almost certainly rise in its place.

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