While Tunisia and Egypt celebrate a new dawn, Bahrain – one of the first countries to flare up with protests after Tunisia’s Jasmine Revolution – is left to question the financial implications of revolution when its ambitions are less successful.

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While Tunisia and Egypt celebrate a new dawn, Bahrain – one of the first countries to flare up with protests after Tunisia’s Jasmine Revolution – is left to question the financial implications of revolution when its ambitions are less successful.

Despite weeks of protests, the ruling Khalifa family remains fully in charge. But the island nation’s economy has suffered. The first blow came when the Bahrain Grand Prix, the opening race of the 2011 Formula One season, was cancelled. At a reported cost of $150m (€107m), the Bahrain International Circuit was a typically grandiose gesture by the Khalifa family to boost the country’s international standing, and the race’s cancellation is a visible reminder of the effect of the civil unrest.

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