Is today's inherently interactive, non-linear, and immersive "deep media" loosening the author's hold on the fate of the story? 'The Art of Immersion' explores the audiences' new role.

While narrative and storytelling have forever been foundational to the human experience and creating meaning, Wired contributing editor Frank Rose's  The Art of Immersion traces a new form of narrative facilitated by the Internet. 20th century mass media (the sitcom, the newspaper, or novel) allowed for only passive consumption, but deep media of today (think: online communities dedicated to discussing reality shows; downloadable video games to supplement television series) is inherently interactive, non-linear, and immersive. But with this new, participatory mode of storytelling come questions about the fate of the author and the audience:

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