An article in The New Yorker considers whether it is more beneficial for companies to allow or restrict access to the web.

James Surowiecki's article in The New Yorker questions whether companies that restrict their employees access to the web actually have a detrimental effect on their productivity.

Over half of all companies block access to social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter. Although this might seem reasonable, Surowiecki points to research that has found that strictly enforcing a ‘no web-browsing' rule on people who usually spend large amounts of their time on the Internet can have a negative effect on their focus and motivation. Spending a large amount of energy trying to curb the temptation to update your profile or send a quick tweet means you are less effective completing that important spreadsheet or being courteous to potential customers.

READ THIS ARTICLE FOR $15
$15 provides access to this article and every case-study, interview, and analysis piece that we publish for the next 30 days. Our Premium Subscription also provides access to a database of over 100,000 articles on innovation in brand, customer, and retail experience.
Already a subscriber? Log in