Stuxnet forced countries to assess their vulnerability to cyber-attacks and make cyberwarfare mainstream defense policy.

This article titled “Cyber-weaponry, virtual battlefields and the changing face of global warfare” was written by Misha Glenny, for The Guardian on Monday 16th May 2011 18.30 UTC

The last year has proved to be a game-changer in the perception of threats in cyberspace. Above all, the discovery of the computer worm Stuxnet alerted the world that cyber-weaponry capable of causing real havoc to advanced industrial systems is now a reality.

Stuxnet was designed to interfere with a particular target: the so-called programmable logic controller regulating the speed of electric motors in plants that included two of Iran’s nuclear facilities. This very specific aim strongly suggests Stuxnet was not the work of a random criminal gang but of a state intelligence service. It has acted as a starting gun in a long-distance cyber-arms race. All countries with a stake in global security are now assessing their cyber-defences and seeking to develop their ability to attack others.

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