MIT's Senseable Cities project shows how data could minimise disruption to the 'human network' and transform political borders.

Networked technologies are ubiquitious and essential but still in a relative technological infancy. What might their long term impact on our countries and borders prove to be?

The pioneering work of MIT's SENSEable City Lab poses some provocative questions in this regard. At FutureEverything Festival 2011 they will present Borderline, which redraws the map of Great Britain from a network of human interactions. MIT's work explores whether regional boundaries defined by centralised governments respect the more natural ways that people interact across space. It investigates whether hierarchical provision for the populace matches the lived reality of everyday life by using the abundant resource of telephone and cellphone data, the largest non-Internet human network:

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