In Brief

In 2011, communication with dolphins has become far more sophisticated, with a research team currently building a 'dolphin translator' prototype aimed at recording, interpreting and responding to the sounds captured from the mammals.

Scientists in the 1960’s discovered some remarkable things about dolphin communication. Neurophysiologist Dr. John C. Lilly used a number of implanted electrodes to discover a ‘pleasure center’ within the dolphins brain, which when stimulated caused the dolphin to physically smile. In the nineties, dolphin sensory abilities researcher Louis Herman reported that with training, dolphins can understand and successfully respond to around 100 words.

In 2011, communication with dolphins has become far more sophisticated, with a research team currently building a ‘dolphin translator’ prototype aimed at recording, interpreting and responding to the sounds captured from the mammals whilst underwater. Denise Herzing of the Wild Dolphin Project has been working on the project since 1998 and has now joined forces with AI researcher Thad Starner to develop the Cetacean Hearing and Telemetry (CHAT) project. Rather than decode the entire dolphin language, the team are hoping to ‘co-create’ a communication format alongside the mammals, utilizing the natural sounds of the dolphin to form a mutually-understood language.  The prototype will consist of a small computer and two hydrophones which together will ‘record, interpret and respond’ to dolphin sounds whilst strapped to diver’s body underwater.

MEMBER CONTENT
This content is available for Basic and Pro Members.
Already a member, log in