An article in The Atlantic examines America's creativity crisis and the ways 'play' could serve as potential antidote.

In her piece for The Atlantic, Laura Seargeant Richardson, principal designer at frog design, suggests that American students aren’t developing the skills needed to thrive in a increasingly complex global economy. While math, science and literacy should remain as the bedrock of any education, the innovation unlocked by play may be our greatest unexploited resource, teaching children the skills required to capitalize on the opportunities presented by global progress. One need only look at the educational systems in rapidly developing countries for evidence that play is no longer something viewed altogether separate from work. In China, the government recently launched a five-year initiative focused on advanced play that is intended to develop its students’ problem solving skills and fostering their creativity. Yet despite these hard facts, America still lags behind.

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