Her songs will start playing and girls will grab each other to dance in tight, elated circles. It doesn't really matter what she's saying, but who she's saying it to.

Guy Brighton
  • 6 june 2011

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This article titled “The Beyoncé groove” was written by Eva Wiseman, for The Observer on Saturday 4th June 2011 23.05 UTC

I don’t dance. It’s a language I don’t understand. It’s Swahili. It’s pollen. I am allergic to the dance – when I listen to music, I like to sing along and occasionally raise my head, like a dog enjoying the wind through a car window. I’m a still person, content when stretched flat on a banquette. I don’t dance, can’t dance and won’t dance. There is, however, one artist whose songs always make my legs twitch. And my arms. And slightly my nostrils. When I saw Beyoncé’s new video “Run the World (Girls)“, yes, I wanted to dance. Specifically, I wanted to do this shaky thing with my shoulders that I find, after Googling, is called the “Eskista”. So that was the first thing I thought: I want to wobble my shoulders like a flickering screen. And then I thought: in a song about female empowerment, why are all the dancers wearing suspenders and sheer basques?

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