An ultrathin, electronic patch applied to the wrist can measure activity in the brain, heart, and muscles.

Monitoring heart arrhythmia and sleep disorders isn’t exactly new to health diagnosis, but it can be an uncomfortable experience for patients who have to be hooked up to various wires and sensors. Effective as it may be, a noninvasive approach would put the patient at ease. John A. Rogers, a professor of materials science at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign has led a team of international researchers who have developed a skin-like prototype of an electronic temporary tattoo to do just that. Measuring activity in the brain, heart and muscles, the innovation could cut down on the number of wires and cables medical personnel use to monitor patients and other applications.

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