Thomas Stevenson's Bivouac NYC re-envisions how we imagine and utilize open space in metropolitan areas.

As densely populated as New York City’s streets and buildings are, there is an excess of open real estate that most New Yorkers might not think of during the day to day: rooftops. Thomas Stevenson noticed the contrast in how underutilized rooftop space is for habitation and decided to build his own mini-commune with the open space.

Bivouac New York is a camp site is comprised of five lean-to tents that includes a canteen with a kitchen and library. Rooftops become a kind of urban outdoors wherein people can stay in the city but separate themselves from the hustle and bustle of city life. In fact, since the station has no wifi or electricity, they are virtually disconnected from the world as well. The detachment places more focus on the relationship between the campers and how they inhabit the space together.

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