A touchscreen made from a sheet of paper marks the future of e-readers, displays, and paintings.

Japanese researchers Kohei Tsuji and Akira Wakita of Keio University have invented a touch-screen display made from ordinary paper. The technology behind this new innovation lies in the color-changing ink printed on one side, and conducting pastes on the other to create an electric circuit. The interactive display is activated by sensors and maintains the flexibility of regular paper, opening the doors to the future of interactive books, paintings, and wallpaper. New Scientist writes:

It's like finger painting, only without the messy paints. Touching the paper activates a copper pressure sensor taped on the back of the paper. This sends electricity through the painted silver wires, which warms electrodes made from carbon paste. Heat radiates through the paper to the color-changing ink on top.

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