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Making Healthy Eating More Appetizing With Lunchbox Art [Pics]

Making Healthy Eating More Appetizing With Lunchbox Art [Pics]
Arts & Culture

One mom encourages good nutrition by making lunch look like cartoon characters.

Yi Chen
  • 10 january 2012


Graphic designer Heather Sitarzewski encourages her young son to finish the food in his lunchbox by making it more pleasing to the eye. These artistic lunchboxes disguise fruits and vegetables with a creative flare and make them visually appetizing. In one example, Sitarzewski turns pasta, peas, bread and raspberries into Miss Piggy. In another, a few pieces of cookies, vegetables and fruits are turned into the Very Hungry Caterpillar character.

Sitarzewski artistic technique isn’t new and was originally an idea from Japan. Parents would often turn their kid’s lunchboxes into works of art, something known has Kyaraben, or cartoon bento. Some parents in Japan would go as far as to create an elaborate scene from a cartoon show using only rice, pickles, vegetables and sashimi.

Sitarzewski is documenting her Kyaraben creations on a Tumblr blog called Lunchbox Awesome. See some of her lunchbox artworks in the gallery below.

Lunchbox Awesome

+Art
+Asia
+children
+culture
+Culture
+Design
+Food
+Health
+japan
+Youth

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