The beer brand believes it has a responsibility to be “of service” and to teach “Heineken citizens” how to be part of a new way of thinking.

Heineken just seemed to be a beer company to me; one with a ripened value due to years of good reputation. I had never thought about the company’s ethics toward profitability or brand positioning until recently when I had dinner with Heineken USA’s VP of Corporate Responsibility and Ethics during a business trip to Washington, D.C.

During our conversation, I made some key discoveries.

I learned how Heineken uses market access to help others. The company, the Heineken executive said, has a responsibility to be “of service” and to teach “Heineken citizens” how to be part of a new way of thinking. For example in sections of Africa, the company works with a non-governmental organization to support the community’s diverse concerns. I am impressed with the scope of the company’s stewardship, ranging from creating innovate child survival approaches to sickle-cell anemia research.

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