Actor-writer David Mitchell says that while the web is full of opinions, without knowing the authors' motives for posting them why should we pay them any attention?

This article titled “An internet troll’s opinion should carry no more weight than graffiti” was written by David Mitchell, for The Observer on Sunday 19th February 2012 00.06 UTC

This Valentine’s Day, as usual, I received several heartfelt anonymous messages. “You’re not funny, you cock”, “Why are you such a smug shit?”, “Just seen you on a repeat of Mock the Week, I wish you would die”. That sort of thing.

But then I get that every day – all comedians do (apart from the funny non-smug ones who are already dead). In fact, everybody does; that’s one of the joys of the internet age. On 14 February everyone used to look forward to the possibility that someone would share their passionate feelings incognito, and now it happens all the time. As soon as you have a Facebook wall, a Twitter feed, or simply a name that someone can type, Anonymous Missives Inc is open for business. And it’s not only people who are the targets of strangers’ ardour – restaurants, bars, hotels, books, movies and DVDs are all the objects of feelings so strong that those holding them are embarrassed to reveal their identity.

BASIC MEMBER CONTENT
This content is available for Basic Members.
Already a member, log in