Designs for the third and final installment for the elevated urban park show that it will wrap around more than 12 million square feet of mixed-use real estate.

At once a blighted relic overgrown with wildflowers from when the last freight train ran along its tracks in 1980, the New York City High Line‘s resurgence as an elevated urban park has been one enjoyed by tourists and residents alike. Fallen into disuse and subsequently lobbied for demolition, these elevated train tracks snaking through Manhattan's West Side were saved by the concerted efforts of a non-profit, The Friends Of The High Line, banned together in opposition. Whether wittingly or not, the recycling of railway into an urban park has spurred real estate development in the neighborhoods which lie along the line, with residents meanwhile acquiescing to an easy peek into their third story apartments in exchange for the rising price of their property. The MTA is now set to develop the West Side Rail Yards-an active train yard for the Long Island Rail Road and an area the High Line is set to wrap around-into more than 12 million square feet of mixed-use real estate. A city area long in transition, in part due to the development of the High Line itself, is now set to receive its third and final installment of the urban park.

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