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Would You Recognize A Popular Product Without Its Label?

Would You Recognize A Popular Product Without Its Label?
Advertising

Brand Spirit presents a project where all visual imagery is removed from an ubiquitous object, rendering it to its pure, but ultimately still recognizable form.

Kyana Gordon
  • 21 march 2012

The question posed by the title of this post is addressed by brand strategist, Andrew Miller‘s project, Brand Spirit. For 100 days, he will be dousing famous products with a coat of white paint, “removing all visual branding, reducing the object to its purest form.”  Our initial thoughts: A Heinz ketchup packet still makes us think about french fries, the Wite-Out bottle becomes ironic, a MTA subway card looks like a dog tag, and the all-white Sharpie is still just a Sharpie. As we’ve seen in other projects that play with visual branding – regardless of what’s omitted, brand identity is stronger than words.

Click through the thumbnails below to view other popular items coated in white paint:

 

Brand Spirit

+advertising
+Brand Development
+brand identity
+branding
+culture
+Entertainment
+USA

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