A new study shows that smelling the herb can actually increase cognitive function.

A new study has discovered that the main chemical component in rosemary can increase brain function.

Scientists from the University of Northumbria found that test subjects' cognitive function improved when they smelled the herb. Sniffing rosemary increased both speed and accuracy in test subjects, who were required to perform certain mental tasks, and seemed to alter mood as well. The highest test scores in the study correlated to the highest concentration of the main chemical component of rosemary, called 1,8-cineole, in the blood.

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