Several designers at the Javits Convention Center decided to break-through the 500+ exhibitions by showing visitors how their products are made.

At the core of New York Design Week is The International Contemporary Furniture Fair, a trade show for designers, retailers, and journalists. Held at the Javits Convention Center, ICFF featured more than 500 exhibitors, and after exploring what seemed like aisle after aisle, many designs started to look the same.

To break out of the clutter, several designers created live ‘pop-up' workshops in their booth, and as a result, these were some of the most heavily trafficked stands of the show. While live demo's aren't a new idea, the workshops created the opportunity for people to watch and engage their curiosity with the craftsmen.  Unlike technology or a traditional pamphlet or brochure that tells a one-dimensional story about a designer's process and resulting work, the workshops engaged multiple senses and encouraged a human connection- at each booth, traditional hand tools were used, which helped add an additional layer of narrative as people watched the product being produced.

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