The SHOAL robots, developed by BMT Group, are equipped with chemical sensors that can send real-time data about the pollution levels in large bodies of water.

European research project SHOAL, managed by BMT Group, has developed intelligent robotic fish equipped with chemical sensors that can send real-time data about the pollution levels in ports and other aquatic areas.

Whereas current methods of pollution research involve taking samples of the water to a lab for testing and waiting for the results, these robots can provide the information almost immediately. The SHOAL fish can detect various forms of pollution, send data to researchers via wi-fi, and also interact with each other to provide a map of the problem and detect its source. They are fully automatic and when their batteries are low they return to a charging dock by themselves. Luke Speller, project leader of SHOAL and senior research scientist at BMT Group, said:

READ THIS ARTICLE FOR $15
$15 provides access to this article and every case-study, interview, and analysis piece that we publish for the next 30 days. Our Premium Subscription also provides access to a database of over 100,000 articles on innovation in brand, customer, and retail experience.
Already a subscriber? Log in