The Ramos uses a remote keypad to 'defuse' the bell and encourage sleepers to move away from their beds.

The Ramos Alarm Clock was originally created by New York City-based engineer Paul Sammut for his personal use. Having too often overslept when depending on traditional alarm clocks to wake him up, Sammut set to the task of making a snooze-proof machine.

Instead of having a button on the clock itself the Ramos will only shut off once a defuse code has been entered on a keypad panel. The code can be the days date, or a random four-digit number that displays on the clock at the push of a button.

In order to discourage snoozers from simply entering the code and falling back into bed the keypad is wireless. With a range of 50 ft, or 100 ft for the long-range version, Sammut suggests placing the defuse panel in the bathroom or kitchen so when the alarm goes off you can begin your day.

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