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Las Vegas Building Constructed From Over 500,000 Collected Beer Bottles

Las Vegas Building Constructed From Over 500,000 Collected Beer Bottles
Design & Architecture

Recycled material enough to fill eight football fields used to build this manufacturing facility.

Yi Chen
  • 13 july 2012


The Morrow Royal Pavilion in Las Vegas could be the world’s largest building made from recycled bottles. Over 500,000 recycled beer bottles were used to construct the 30,000-square-foot structure. Looking at the exterior of the architecture, there’s no way of telling that glass bottles were used to build it. The process involved crushing the beer bottles into fine grains and mixing it with fly ash, before melting the composite and pouring it into molds to create ‘GreenStone’. From afar, the bricks look more like sandstone.

The Morrow Royal Pavilion is inspired by the famous Swarkestone Hall Pavilion in England. The project was started by entrepreneur Scott McCombs, with the help of Realm of Design who collected the bottles from hotels along the Las Vegas Strip.

+Architecture
+beer bottles
+bottle
+building
+Design
+environmental
+Environmental / Green
+environmental sustainable
+Europe
+fashion / apparel
+fitness / sport
+glass
+green
+Las Vegas
+material
+recycle
+UK
+USA

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