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Light-Up Gloves Help Cyclists Indicate Turning Signals

Light-Up Gloves Help Cyclists Indicate Turning Signals
Arts & Culture

This fashion item helps bikers raise their visibility while riding at night.

Yi Chen
  • 24 july 2012


The Early Winter Night Biking Gloves not only keep cyclists warm during the cooler evenings, but also provide clearer visibility for them on the roads. The wool gloves are embedded with conductive areas and also LED lights. When you hold your hand in form of a fist, it closes the electric circle and causes an arrow to light up. This allows cyclists to easily indicate a bold turn signal for drivers to see behind them.

The gloves were created by designer Irene Posch who wanted something that aesthetically and functionally raised visibility for urban bikers. The pair of gloves operates on just one 3V coin cell battery.

Early Winter Night Biking Gloves

+Art
+bikers
+culture
+cyclist
+Design
+Electronics
+Electronics & Gadgets
+Fashion
+fashion / apparel
+Gadget
+gloves
+LED
+light
+light up
+technology

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