Instead of making one-time food drops, the Locust Farm concept gives refugees the tools they need to grow their own grasshoppers.

Reimagining what international aid looks like, one team suggests providing a more sustainable source of food: grasshoppers. Based on a study of the largest refugee camp in the world in Dadaab, Kenya, the team developed Locust Farm, a food kit that lets refugees raise their own insects.

As the project explains:

This is a kit of food consisting of various compartments; one side of the box is dedicated to grasshopper adults (male and female) and the other dedicated to newborns (eggs and pupae). Next to this box various accessories needed for each home to raise their own insects, to obtain as much food as necessary to avoid malnutrition. Linked to this kit is a small water tank for the grasshoppers to drink from, a small amount of earth with nutrients for the females to lay their eggs on, and a pipette to maintain the farm's humidity.

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