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Typeface Made Out Of Real Money Celebrates The Lottery

Typeface Made Out Of Real Money Celebrates The Lottery
Advertising

DDB New York created a series of minimalistic posters for the NY draw featuring words made up of stacks of dollar bills.

Emma Hutchings
  • 20 august 2012

For the New York Lottery’s “Yeah, that kind of rich” campaign, DDB New York created a typeface out of stacks of real money, which appears on minimalistic posters, forming statements such as “Banks ask you for a bailout” and “You shop, the market rises”.

Typeface Made Out Of Real Money

Creativity reports that the agency brought in a typographer who came up with the special ‘font’ and spent two months creating the letters from piles of dollar bills. Clear fishing line and hat pins were used to keep the bills in place, and each ad used about $1000-$1500 worth of money to create.

Typeface Made Out Of Real Money

The posters are running on buses, shelters, and subway stations in New York. Check out the making of the ads in the video below:

DDB New York

+advertising
+Design
+fitness / sport
+posters
+retail
+technology
+typeface
+USA

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