A global CAD experiment resulted in unique, ceramic artwork that proves the new production method isn't only for a mass scale.

If you were to assume that 3-D printing is mass-production, creating identical objects that can't be considered artesian, think again. A Belgian design studio, Unfold, has created a new form of art called Stratigraphic Manufactury, which uses CAD printers and digital software to produce code that creates porcelain pieces, such as cups, bowls and vases.

The studio, founded in 2002 by Claire Warnier and Dries Verbruggen, started the project in 2009 by sharing their designs with manufacturers around the world. Unfold asked that the studios not alter the code (design) of the pieces, but rather gave them the opportunity to use different consistencies of porcelain and any sort of ceramic 3-D printer to realize the designs. The resulting pieces from the UK, Israel and Turkey created unique works that reflected the inconsistencies of the production variances. The video below shows the studio's process of creating a design blueprint and printing a vase.

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