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Biodegradable Urn Turns People Into Trees After They Die [Pics]

Biodegradable Urn Turns People Into Trees After They Die [Pics]
Arts & Culture

The Bio-Urn is a greener and more organic alternative to traditional burial practices.

Yi Chen
  • 1 october 2012

Gerard Moline offers an organic alternative to traditional burial practices and “reintroduces the human being to the natural circle of life.” The Bio-Urn is made from biodegradable materials, including coconut shell, compacted peat and cellulose. Inside the urn is a seed of a tree, and once planted, the seed germinates and begins to grow.

The mortuary urn is a patented design and rethinks the meaning of “life after death” and provides a greener option than traditional methods. Embalming bodies often uses harsh chemicals, while caskets are often made from non-sustainable materials and even endangered wood.

Click through the gallery to see more images of the project.

Gerard Moline

Photos courtesy of Martin Azua

+biodegradable
+culture
+Design
+eco-friendly
+environmental
+Environmental / Green
+green
+Sustainability

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