Implementing interactive devices and platforms in classrooms will change the way we teach students and allow us to focus on individuals.

Every four years during presidential elections, education betterment becomes topical.  It is the one stomping area upon which both parties agree. George W. Bush rallied around “No Child Left Behind” (great name) and President Obama has introduced “Race To The Top.” Both agree, as do Bill and Melinda Gates, that investments in better teaching will improve student learning. But there are some flies in this proverbial ointment. One such hindrance is teacher assessment or measurement. Teachers, administrators and unions agree that measurement of student performance is warranted; however, their comfort level surrounding implementation doesn’t always extend to the teachers, themselves. The old advertising adage, re-purposed for education, does not work in today’s world: “I know half of my teachers are good, I just don’t know which half.”

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