Eyewear equipped with cameras translate eye movements into computer input, replacing the need for a mouse or keyboard.

Computers make life easier, quicker, and control the world around us. Unless, that is, you happen to be one of the millions of people who can’t use them.

Now, researchers at the Imperial College in London have built a special pair of glasses that will let people with limited mobility—such as those suffering from multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injuries, Parkinson’s, or muscular dystrophy—interact with a computer using only their eyes.

The device, named the GT3D, is nothing fancy. Just a pair of cheap glasses with two cameras hooked on to the sides which track the wearer’s eye movements. The changing positions of their pupils are recorded and translated into a computer input—just how a mouse or trackball would.

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