The Access4Kids device allows otherwise motor-skill impaired children to use the technology.

For years, handicapped individuals lacking fine-motor skills have had difficulty interacting with computers and other technology. The creation of tablets and other touch-sensitive devices has created yet another hurdle for disabled adults and children alike.

Georgia Tech researchers, led by Ayanna Howard, hope to have bridged the gap of tablet use for the motor-skill impaired with the creation of Access4Kids.

Access4Kids is a wireless sleeve that uses a sensor system to translate movements into fine-motor controls. The device, which can be worn on a sleeve or the arm of a chair/wheelchair, uses a set of three force-sensitive patches to detect pressure and movement for conversion into control instructions for the tablet.

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