David Pearson reworks the classic novel cover to reference its plot.

If you haven't read George Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four, you can guess a major theme just by looking at this new cover design. Spoiler alert: the book deals heavily with censorship, which designer David Pearson brings to life by covering the black, debossed letters of the title and author with two bars of matt black foil. The choice creates a startling effect- look at the book from far away, and you'll only be able to tell it's a Penguin book.

The new cover design is part of Penguin's ‘Great Orwell' series, a re-release of five of Orwell's greatest works. Pearson and his team designed all five covers for the ‘Great Orwell' editions, and although Pearson refers to Nineteen Eighty-Four as the ‘risk taker of the series,' each of the re-booted cover designs stands out as fresh and thought-provoking. When PSFK asked Pearson about the bold choice for Nineteen Eighty-Four, he told us his inspiration was ‘born out of altering/erasing the identity of the book,' adding, ‘using classic Penguin livery – which everyone knows and understands – allowed for this sort of fun and games — I would argue that the idea wouldn't work otherwise.'

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