The Filabot turns old soda bottles and product packaging into filament, making the new tech a more sustainable process.

3D printing is poised to disrupt nearly every industry–we can 3D print houses, kidneys, and even miniature replicas of ourselves. As the potential output scenarios of 3D printing grow, our thoughts turn to input; while 3D printing replaces the need to use traditional, more costly resources like wood, the use of plastics isn't the most eco-friendly. To help make the process more sustainable, Vermont Technical College student Tyler McNaney created The Filabot, a desktop machine that recycles common plastics into 3D printing filament.

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